Here is a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

Webster’s dictionary defines translucent as “letting light pass through, but not transparent.” A transparent object, like a clean sheet of glass, is almost invisible. You see everything through a transparent object as if it were not there at all. An opaque object, on the other hand, blocks light completely. A translucent object allows light to pass through, but diffusely, while maintaining its form and texture. Objects on the other side cannot be clearly distinguished. A crystal is translucent. So is a sculpture of frosted glass: if the sun were to shine on it from behind, you would see the light passing through the sculpture, and it would appear to be glowing from the inside.

Translucent people also appear to glow from the inside. They have access to their deepest nature as peaceful, limitless, free, unchanging, and at the same time they remain fully involved in the events of their personal lives. Thoughts, fears, and desires still come and go; life is still characterized by temporary trials, misfortunes, and stress. But the personal story is no longer opaque: it is now capable of reflecting something deeper, more luminous and abiding, that can shine through it. (more…)

God and I have always had something of an up-and-down relationship. I really like Him (or is it a Her or an It? I’ve never been quite sure) a lot. I mean A LOT. More than anything else.  But still, we’ve had our struggles.

My grandmother was my very favorite relative, complete with a friendly dog and a friendly cat, closets which smelled of mothballs, and an endless supply of wonderful desserts. She went to church every Sunday and prayed, and she taught me to do the same.  I picked it up pretty easy.

“God, this is Nicholas here.” (That was my name when I was a kid, Nicholas.) “God, thank you very, very much for making me captain of the cricket team. That was very nice of you. And thank you for the B grade in English. I was wondering if you could help me out with Biology, and maybe get me a B in that too? Oh and by the way, you know that girl with the blond pigtails, Molly Smithers? Well God, I’d really like to kiss her.   God..?   God..?   Are you there, God..?    Hello..?”

I was quite conscientious about my praying back then, but I was never quite sure if anyone was listening. Seemed there was a lot of static on the line, and I wasn’t quite sure if my mail was getting read, or if my phone calls were being listened to. (more…)

Here’s a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

The feminine in all of us intuitively knows how to feel. People with more feminine energy (usually, but not always, women), whether translucent or not, have a much greater intuitive capacity to feel than people with more masculine energy. Amy McCarrel also works with women to cultivate feminine translucence:

A woman’s heart is a genius of the moment. If you look around a room of people, women’s hearts are particularly sensitive in this way, constantly feeling what’s mean in the room, what’s closed in the room, what feels good in her body when somebody speaks, the sound of the voice, how relaxed it is, what they’re saying, or if it’s coming from a place of mental tension. It’s happening all the time.

The world is metered by my heart. The way somebody walks down the street: I’m safe, I can relax, or I need to protect myself. Just metering constantly what feels true, a truth meter. Woman can always know, feel, when a man’s words are correct. It’s truly one of the most profound gifts of the feminine, the genius of the heart, her inability to not feel. Everything is washing through. It’s coming in constantly, coming in, coming in, coming in. If something coming at it is less than true, it hits the heart and it hurts. If something comes at the heart that’s true, it washes through, and it opens. Whether I’m completely conscious or not in any given moment doesn’t alter the heart’s receptivity.

This feminine gift, of being able to feel everything in the body, can become contracted if we are caught in the Iago trance, and then it turns into melodrama. Consequently, the feminine in all of us is always afraid to be too much, to feel too much. It is also quite possible to have deep awakening, to be resting deeply in spaciousness, and to still be very shut down in one’s capacity to feel. A traditional masculine spiritual path can be very strong on wakefulness, but very weak on emotional embodiment; masculine-based spirituality has illustrated this for thousands of years. As a result, in most spiritual teachings, the advice has been to remain still, like a Buddha statue, to watch feelings pass, not to touch them. In a masculine approach, deeply feeling grief or anger would simply be a symptom of spiritual immaturity. Hypermasculine spirituality cannot help you to free up feeling, or to feel more deeply, because generally it has been founded by men who are themselves emotionally crippled. (more…)

Please enjoy the following except

from The Translucent Revolution, New World Library, 2005:


Millions of people have now had an awakening glimpse into their real
nature. The experience may not be stable, but it can never be overlooked
again. It is not the access that challenges us now, but the actualization of it
in our daily lives. David Deida, the prolific writer and teacher, calls such a
glimpse a “poking through.” To Deida, these moments are fleeting, almost
inconsequential in and of themselves. “I think it’s far more important what
people do, given the ‘poke through.’ How, given a glimpse, they dedicate their
occupation, their attention. Otherwise, that glimpse is fleeting and useless.”
Without this essential, pivotal awakening there can be no real depth to
life. We live preoccupied with hallucinations. After suffering the endless
slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, it’s a relief to know a dimension of
reality where nothing is happening, where we know ourselves to be essential
peace, where we are connected with everything, a state where love rules
supreme.

hug


awakening-199x3002

If you’ve watched the television news in the last few months, or listened to the radio, or been on the internet, or looked at a magazine… or even just talked to well… anybody, you must be aware that the general consensus is that this is a time of unprecedented challenge and transition. Economically, that often gets focused onto the United States, but actually in the wider implications, the transition that we are passing through is global.

I’m sure you don’t need me to spell out what that means. Whether we focus on sinking into a global recession–or even depression–or global warming, or peak oil, or the many unresolved political conflicts around the world: whatever parameter you choose to focus on, many people feel today fear that we are sitting on a bus heading over the edge of a cliff. Depressing, isn’t it?

Suppose for a moment that your house develops severe dry rot in the basement. The contractor comes, takes a look and says, “Sorry, there’s nothing I can do. It’s too far gone. Better to tear the place down.” This would be inconvenient, but not the end of the world. Now suppose that it was your neighborhood gone to seed, taken over by… what? Lawyers? Communists? White supremacists? Doesn’t matter. If you don’t like the area where you’re living you can always move to another part of town. Now what about if it was your city, or your state, or even the country? There’s always an alternative. You could move to Phoenix, or Alaska, or even Mexico or Europe. Bali is very nice, too. (more…)