Now listen up, ya’ll, because this is seriously interesting and unbelievable.

I made a new friend recently: a very funny, honest, tell-it-like-it-is kind of guy, who I’ll be interviewing later this week. But more about him later.

First let me tell you this incredible story that he passed on to me.

About 6 years ago, my friend heard a story about a mental hospital in Hawaii. This was a locked-down hospital for the criminally insane: dangerous people who needed constant supervision. A new psychiatrist came to this hospital and agreed to look over the patients’ medical charts and see what he could do to help them, without actually seeing them one-on-one at all.

What I’m going to tell you now may sound unbelievable and ridiculous, but my friend Joe has verified that it is real. After some months, every one of the patients in that mental hospital was healed. By now, they have all fully rehabilitated and have been discharged. This happened without medication, without therapy.

The psychiatrist in question was a Hawaiian man trained in the ancient Hawaiian art of Ho’oponopono. Ho’o what? Ho’oponopono. It means “to make right,” to see everything around you, whether it is directly a part of your life or not, as your responsibility. You must have the attitude that, “If I experience it, then I created it, and if I created it, I can dissolve it.” (more…)

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mountain topWhenever a group of people get together and become more honest with each other, one of the first thing to happen is that they realize how much we all want the same thing.  It happens in marriage guidance counseling, we come to the recognition that we both want love, we both want to be seen and acknowledged.  It happens in any kind of business intervention: we come together as a team and realize we all want and need the business to succeed, we want the workplace to be inspiring and relaxed.  Ultimately it happens politically, when the leaders of nations recognize that they are more likely to get their own needs met when they can also recognize the need of the other.

The greatest area of split and misunderstanding, which I discover among my friends and other writers and teachers is the split between the longing of the spirit and material desire.  To paint the picture in broad strokes, I am aware of two categories of people I know.  On one hand, I’ve spend a lot of my life in “spiritual circles.”  I lived with Poonjaji in India, I’ve lived in community in other parts of my life.  When we make our home in this camp life is about liberation.  We mediate.  We do Yoga.  We chant.  We disassemble the structures in the mind because we have fallen in love with a deep sense of spaciousness and peace.  When you live exclusively in this camp the desire for money becomes a hinderance to be avoided, not a goal to be pursued.  Relationships are okay-ish, as long as they don’t get too co-dependent.  Frequently, our relationship with our parents is something to be “completed” and “resolved” rather than celebrated.  When you live in this camp, wanting to make it in the world is the greatest symptom of ego-entrapment.

But there is also another camp, where I equally enjoy setting up my tent from time to time.  This camp is much better decorated, has better food, and everyone has an i-phone.  In this camp the emphasis is on worldly success of every kind.  Making money is a good thing.  So is having great relationships, great sex, better health and, in fact, having better anything is good.  When you hang out a while in this camp and look back to the other side, the spiritual people look like a bunch of losers. Meditating on their navels and letting go of attachments, you can see from here that they can’t pay the rent, their relationships are often messy, and they often have health problems to boot.

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Jack_Canfield[1]Arjuna dialogs with Success Coach Jack Canfield

Arjuna:    Jack, you are recognized as a great authority on success.  In the last months, with changes in the economy, many people are re-evaluating what success is all about. First of all, it’s more difficult these days to make money and accumulate a lot of stuff because the economy is not so supportive. Second thing is that becoming extremely wealthy has become less fashionable with the collapse of the banking industry. I wonder if you have felt called to reevaluate what success is all about, with the changes in our economy?

Jack:    I think with the changes in the economy, the recession, the Wall Street banking crisis, mortgage crisis and international meltdown in the markets, many people have lost a lot of money.  I’ve had friends that lost their entire savings with Bernie Madoff and other people that had other foundations and sources of income that dried up.

Therefore, they have to re-evaluate what success means to them and what most people are finding out is, and I’m looking at this in my own life as well, that success isn’t just what you accumulate, not just the amount of money you have or the toys you’re able to buy, but true success is having time freedom, emotional freedom, the freedom to pursue your own spiritual and emotional growth.

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the-secret

Imagine this.
The young heir of enormous fortune goes out for an evening with his friends. They go to a fabulous restaurant and eat all kinds of great food. They go to a club and dance. They stay out till the small hours of the morning, when our hero stumbles out into the parking lot, in a disoriented condition, to find his car. Unfortunately he trips on a pothole in the parking lot, falls to the ground and bangs his head. He is knocked out for just a few moments, but when he comes around he’s forgotten everything; who he is and where he is, and above all, he’s forgotten the fact that he has access to unlimited wealth.

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