I just watched a fascinating new film this weekend, which has got considerably less attention than it deserves. It’s called “The Living Matrix,” and features Bruce Lipton, Lynne McTaggart, Eric Pearl, and Marilyn Schlitz, president of the Institute of Noetic Sciences.The film explores the fascinating question of spontaneous remission from disease: healings that occur everyday, and yet are unexplained by conventional medical science.

The movie tells us that every day, in hospitals all over the world, people will suddenly get better for no logical reason whatsoever. A cancer tumor the size of a grapefruit can disappear overnight. By now, this is well-documented. Because there is absolutely no explanation within the current medical model, these cases simply get ignored.

The premise of “The Living Matrix” is that we don’t understand the mechanics of “miraculous healing” and spontaneous remission simply because we are applying the wrong model. We’ve tended to view the body as though it’s a machine. We feed it the right nutrients, give it the right exercise, keep it well hydrated, and, when it gets sick, we go to an expert who tells us to take the right kind of drugs. It’s essentially a mechanical view of the human body. This view, which is by far the most prevalent in contemporary medicine and science, sees consciousness as a by-product of the body. (more…)

Here is a passage from my 2005 Bestseller, “The Translucent Revolution.”

vision3Vision is vital. It is the fuel that motivates action. It gives meaning to our lives, the aspiration to reach beyond our limits. Vision tells us where to put our energy, allows us to push through unforeseen obstacles, and, when a group of people work together, it is the cohesive force that keeps them motivated and connected.

Vision also seems to be innate. My nine-year-old son used to have two rabbits. They had never spent any time among other rabbits; they were still babies when they left their mother. We built them a fenced enclosure in our yard so that they could hop around all day on their own. Their very first day in the enclosure, they started to make burrows. No one showed them how; burrowing was hardwired into their DNA. Our cat knows how to chase birds without an instructional video. Pigs roll in dirt; dogs sniff everything.  And human beings . . . they have an innate capacity to sense their own, and life’s, potential, without any outside help. We are born with a sense of wonder and awe that is untouched by the limitations of the constructed world. The capacity to rest in this innocence is what makes childhood a time of wonder, for many the only time of wonder that they ever know. Although unaware of the stresses and disappointments of the adult world, this vision of our true heart is full of wisdom. It knows something about what is ultimately real.
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