Uncategorized


Over the July 4th long weekend, I went on a trip with my oldest son, Abhi. We drove down south through the gold country to the old mining town of Auburn, and from there  even further south to the remote town of Foresthill. I’ve heard Foresthill sometimes called the “armpit of the Sierras,” which is, I’d say, a little unfair. It’s not really on the way to anywhere, so you might possibly get the sense that it’s where you end up when you get lost. We only stopped in Foresthill long enough to get ourselves a fire permit, and then we drove another 40 miles on a tiny road that clung to the side of the steep American River ravine. We passed across the French Meadow Reservoir dam, and kept driving. During the entire 40 mile journey from Forest Hill, I don’t remember passing a single dwelling. The road turned to dirt after about 28 miles.

We parked our car at the end of the dirt road, a place called Talbot crossing. A ranger had been stationed there to perform a survey that is conducted once every five years. His job was to monitor how many people hike in from the crossing into the Granite Chief wilderness area. “There have only been five,” he told us, “the entire day. And that will probably be it for the holiday weekend.”  Although this is one of the most popular weekends of the year to get outside, there was only one party parking at the campground where the road ends. From here, Abhi and I hiked in another 4 hours with everything we needed in our backpacks.

I’ve given you this build-up to emphasize that where we were going was REMOTE. Even on the busiest weekend of the year, there was nobody here. We set up our small tent next to a fast-moving creek.

And for the next 2 days, we focused on doing… absolutely nothing.

Sure, we cooked some food now and then. We talked a little. On the second day we took a long hike. We were back on the earth exactly, I mean exactly, the way that it was naturally occurring before the human mind imposed its ideas on it.

We call an experience like this going into “nature” or “the wilderness.” But actually, if you think about it, these words are quite unnecessary. We should really just have a word for “not nature,” meaning roads and cities and towns and trains and factories. Everything else doesn’t really need a name because it’s what the Earth is like already. We didn’t go “into nature,” we just took a break from “not nature.” We left behind physical structures and schedules and electronics, and we also left behind all of the habits associated with those things. (more…)

Advertisements

It often happens in life that you knew something could have gone better.

A job interview, a date, a public talk: you walk away down on yourself, convinced that you blew it.

And then sometimes it happens that things just flow.  No effort, no preparation, no big deal, and magic takes over.  This was one of those times.

Dr Emmett Miller lives in my small town of Nevada City.  He has a home video studio, and invited me over to do an interview.  We talked for about an hour, and had a great time.  I like what came out of it.  What do you think?

shatter1

As we deepen our practice of relaxing, waiting, and not knowing, we start to experience our points of view as if they were a variety of costumes. We dress ourselves up for play, like a child putting on a cowboy hat or a nurse’s outfit. And then we take the costume off again.

Most translucents share this fluid relationship to belief. They pick up and discard points of view, knowing them for what they are, just fleeting opinions that we can ride like a bus, and then get off when we need to. Through practice, we do not lose all beliefs; we simply melt them from solid to liquid states. We dissolve the stuckness around belief so we can embrace contradiction. Translucent living means living in paradox, while remaining at ease. To the dominant Iago trance, this fluidity appears flaky and lacking in integrity. The old model respects leaders with iron wills and concrete mind-sets.

(more…)

Generally I post stuff that is more interesting to you, at least that is my intention.  But today I’ve decided to post something interesting to me!  My oldest son, Abhi has developed a passion for photography over the last several years, and has emerged as one of the best photographers at his school.  Here is a collection I’d love to share with you of some close ups he took, using a home made lens, for a project last year.

If you like his work, he would like you to do him a favor.  Please go to youtube.com, visit his channel there, and rate his project  (one to five stars) and post a comment for him.

Enjoy a wonderful summer

with love

Arjuna