Translucent Revolution


Here’s a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

With the willingness to be less defined comes a loosening of our grip on the past. The past is of little use when you have no case to defend. If the trial is dismissed as boring and irrelevant, you can send the witnesses home to get on with their lives and dump the bulging dossier of carefully crafted case notes into the trash. Translucents have a natural interest in forgiving and moving on. Forgiveness is no longer a moral virtue, or something we need to practice, but the effortless by-product of no longer needing to protect anidentity with a story attached to it. The past is not healed; it simply ceases to be useful.

I know a woman named Sarah who had memories of abuse as a child. She was never quite sure which of the events she remembered actually happened, but they certainly all seemed real. She saw a number of therapists over many years. She visited her family from time to time; she tried to sit down with her father to find out what had really happened. She joined a support group. This identity, as a survivor of abuse, was one of the first things she would tell you about herself. Some years ago, Sarah came to a gathering I offered. She had an awakening; she discovered reality without the filters of her mind. (more…)

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Here is a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

Webster’s dictionary defines translucent as “letting light pass through, but not transparent.” A transparent object, like a clean sheet of glass, is almost invisible. You see everything through a transparent object as if it were not there at all. An opaque object, on the other hand, blocks light completely. A translucent object allows light to pass through, but diffusely, while maintaining its form and texture. Objects on the other side cannot be clearly distinguished. A crystal is translucent. So is a sculpture of frosted glass: if the sun were to shine on it from behind, you would see the light passing through the sculpture, and it would appear to be glowing from the inside.

Translucent people also appear to glow from the inside. They have access to their deepest nature as peaceful, limitless, free, unchanging, and at the same time they remain fully involved in the events of their personal lives. Thoughts, fears, and desires still come and go; life is still characterized by temporary trials, misfortunes, and stress. But the personal story is no longer opaque: it is now capable of reflecting something deeper, more luminous and abiding, that can shine through it. (more…)

Here is a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

Maria attended one of our retreats a few years ago. Now in her fifties, she has been practicing meditation, which she had learned from a well-known Indian guru, for more than thirty years. She had a very calm, empty, silent presence. She dressed in plain, very sensible clothes, and her gray hair was cut in a short, boyish style. After some days, she told us that her greatest difficulty and disappointment was that she still had strong emotions. She felt herself overwhelmed by grief or anger from time to time, which both she and her husband agreed was a sign of weakness, a lack of depth in her meditation practice. (more…)

Here’s a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

The feminine in all of us intuitively knows how to feel. People with more feminine energy (usually, but not always, women), whether translucent or not, have a much greater intuitive capacity to feel than people with more masculine energy. Amy McCarrel also works with women to cultivate feminine translucence:

A woman’s heart is a genius of the moment. If you look around a room of people, women’s hearts are particularly sensitive in this way, constantly feeling what’s mean in the room, what’s closed in the room, what feels good in her body when somebody speaks, the sound of the voice, how relaxed it is, what they’re saying, or if it’s coming from a place of mental tension. It’s happening all the time.

The world is metered by my heart. The way somebody walks down the street: I’m safe, I can relax, or I need to protect myself. Just metering constantly what feels true, a truth meter. Woman can always know, feel, when a man’s words are correct. It’s truly one of the most profound gifts of the feminine, the genius of the heart, her inability to not feel. Everything is washing through. It’s coming in constantly, coming in, coming in, coming in. If something coming at it is less than true, it hits the heart and it hurts. If something comes at the heart that’s true, it washes through, and it opens. Whether I’m completely conscious or not in any given moment doesn’t alter the heart’s receptivity.

This feminine gift, of being able to feel everything in the body, can become contracted if we are caught in the Iago trance, and then it turns into melodrama. Consequently, the feminine in all of us is always afraid to be too much, to feel too much. It is also quite possible to have deep awakening, to be resting deeply in spaciousness, and to still be very shut down in one’s capacity to feel. A traditional masculine spiritual path can be very strong on wakefulness, but very weak on emotional embodiment; masculine-based spirituality has illustrated this for thousands of years. As a result, in most spiritual teachings, the advice has been to remain still, like a Buddha statue, to watch feelings pass, not to touch them. In a masculine approach, deeply feeling grief or anger would simply be a symptom of spiritual immaturity. Hypermasculine spirituality cannot help you to free up feeling, or to feel more deeply, because generally it has been founded by men who are themselves emotionally crippled. (more…)

Just as you might have given up hope of ever hearing from me again, just as you’re on the way to buy flowers for the funeral, we’re back. Did you miss me? As you might have noticed, I’ve been keeping an extremely low profile the last months. Hardly a blog post or a tweet or a chirp or a facebook post since February. But I’m back, and ready to play again. Here’s a little summary of what’s been going on.

Back in January, we started having a few problems in our office with being able to communicate effectively with our list of friends. Some people were not getting their emails on time. Things were bouncing back that shouldn’t: you know how it goes. So my office manager discovered a super-duper enhanced new alternative for delivering email to our friends.

“How long will it take to implement?” I asked.
“Oh, two to four days,” came the reply.
“Okay,” I said. “If it’s going to make things easier, let’s do it.”
Four months later…

The situation has been a bit like I needed to go down to the store to buy some butter for our family meal (sending news is the butter, and you are the family). So I’ve been driving down to get the butter in a slightly clunky car that doesn’t always start. I call the mechanic to ask what to do, expecting perhaps a little tune-up. A few days later I find a jet plane parked in my driveway. When I climb in the cockpit to go buy butter, I’m faced with an overwhelming array of knobs, panels, gauges, and LED displays.

“What am I supposed to do with this?” I ask. “It’s overwhelming.”

“Yes,” comes the enthusiastic reply. “But it will get you down to the grocery store in one thousandth the time of driving.”
It looks like we’ve finally figured out how to switch on the engine of the jet plane at least, and now we’re able to communicate again.

During this time, there’s been other stuff going on too. About 18 months ago, I met a charming fella named Vishen Lakhiani who read my book the Translucent Revolution and loved it. He suggested we make it into a multi-media home study course called “Living Awakening.” In the last months I’ve been putting the final tweaks on that course.

So many of us these days are having strong glimpses of awakening: of the dimension of ourselves which is limitless, spacious, free, which is love itself. The challenge is not in the access anymore, but in how we live it. Living Awakening is based on video interviews with some of the most successful people alive on the planet whose contribution to the world has been grounded in awakening of consciousness. You may be surprised to find out about the secret lives of some of the people you see regularly on Oprah.

Chameli and I have also been putting our Deeper Love intensive into a course that you can do at home as well. I’ll tell you a little more about that in my next post.

And the last thing that’s been inspiring to me is what’s been happening in our Awakening Coaching Training. For thousands of years, if you felt the longing to drop more deeply into yourself, to feel the divine, most of what was on the menu was hierarchical and patriarchal. That means if you had a longing for greater depth, you would go find a teacher, usually a man and often of oriental origins, and surrender completely to his beliefs and guidance. The more deeply you subjugated your will to that teacher, the more  your ego would die and “enlightenment” would theoretically bloom. Theoretically.  As you may be aware, these kind of scenarios often involve a crash landing.

Something completely different is happening on the planet today. Friends are able to help friends to wake up from the trance of separation. I’ve been training facilitators of awakening since 1995, and the results in the last months have become even more inspiring. I’d love for you to join me this Thursday at 6pm to hear about what’s been going on. A number of awakening coaches will be on the line with me to share their experiences as well. If you miss the live event, the call will be recorded and you can listen to the replay. If you’d like to join us, click here to register for free.

Here is a passage from my 2005 Bestseller, “The Translucent Revolution.”

As with every other area of our lives, there is a symbiotic relationship between the depth of our translucence and the way we view otherness. Translucence naturally shifts our habits of relating, without our doing anything about it. We have less to defend as we come to know ourselves as bigger than our own story, and our relating naturally becomes less strategic. As we see the other as myself, even if only in snapshots, we find that compassion occurs effortlessly. We develop more humor about the idiosyncrasies of our personality. We have less investment in laboriously working things out, and a greater willingness to breathe a sigh and return to innocence. The need to change others relaxes, since we are less tied to them as a source of our well-being. All these things can happen more or less spontaneously as by-products of waking up. At the same time, the attention we bring to our habits of relating can deepen and stabilize our expression of translucence. We can always bring more skillful means, more as an art form than as self-improvement, to our relating. We can become more aware of, and tell the truth about, the old habits that have created separation. These old habits run deep, and they will not necessarily die on their own. Our social environment reinforces them. When we are willing to put awakening into the fire of relationship, it will reveal all old habits and allow them to be released. Says Gay Hendricks:

“I think therein lies the difficulty, as well as the awesome beauty, of relationships. The universe is attempting to meet itself in play. When one person meets another, as that space links up with that space again, it pushes to the surface all the little places where we’ve withdrawn from space. Whether it’s being physically beaten, or starved to death, or criticized, or in beating others, those are the places where we’ve withdrawn and crystallized into mass, and then that has to come to the surface.”
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Here is a passage from my 2005 Bestseller, “The Translucent Revolution.”

Carolyn Anderson and John Zwerver, the founders of a UN-affiliated organization called Global Family, call this model of people working together “co-creation.” Anderson is the co-author of The Co-Creators Handbook. She defines co-creation as “co-participating consciously with the laws or patterns of life itself, conscious alignment with the essence of others and with nature.”

Anderson and Zwerver offer several other examples of co-creative businesses, where the CEO or president has come to a position of stewardship, drawing out and giving voice to the innate wisdom of the collective. For as long as we can remember, Iago-based business has used a dominator model.  Decisions are made by the CEO and senior management, who are retained by investors to represent their interests: to make as much money as possible. The dominator model of doing business may make money, but the hidden cost is high. First, everyone in the company, from middle management down to the shop floor, is placed in a position of subordination. Divorced from their own vision, their integrity and inspiration become entirely irrelevant in this ask-no-questions environment. If you want to keep your job, you don’t question company policy. People feel used. Absenteeism and job turnover rise, since those doing the hands-on work feel little or no loyalty to the company, to its reputation, or to what it produces.

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