September 2010


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My friend Luis Diaz has written a fantastic book called Memory in the Cells. He has kindly asked me to write the foreword, and here it is. I will be interviewing him on Thursday, September 23rd at 6pm PST.

To begin, I must confess that the way I am writing this foreword to Luis’s Diaz’s book involves a kind of cheating,  Usually the foreword is written just on the merit of the book alone. In this case I have access to background information that gives me an unfair handicap.  I have know the author quite well for many years. We have been  in a mens’ group together, we swim in the South Yuba river, we eat food together, we take walks here in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

I’ve met so many people over the years who have written great books, with great methods, but the question alway’s arises, “How much is what they are writing about reflected in the way they live?”

Someone could, for example, write a book about emotional freedom, but how do they actually respond when they are insulted by somebody? Somebody else could write a book about success and trust, but how much much is that reflected in the way that they deal with life’s little dissapointments?  That is always the question when it comes to a book. It all sounds good, but how much is it lived? And this is where my cheating can be helpful, to me and to you, the reader, as well, because this book is not just a theory of releasing memory from the cells. This book is written by somebody who is palpably living in a released way. Just in the way that he chooses to spend his time, or just how he is with a waitress in the restaurant, or with his kids, being with Luis you can feel that this is a book written not only from a theory, but it’s written from a different way of perceiving life.

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I am amazed and inspired by everything I have heard from this band.  Dhani Harrison is George’s son.

Their first album comes out Nov 5th

Get ready!

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Here is a passage from my book The Translucent Revolution.

Maria attended one of our retreats a few years ago. Now in her fifties, she has been practicing meditation, which she had learned from a well-known Indian guru, for more than thirty years. She had a very calm, empty, silent presence. She dressed in plain, very sensible clothes, and her gray hair was cut in a short, boyish style. After some days, she told us that her greatest difficulty and disappointment was that she still had strong emotions. She felt herself overwhelmed by grief or anger from time to time, which both she and her husband agreed was a sign of weakness, a lack of depth in her meditation practice. (more…)

Whenever I start a new client with Awakening Coaching, it begins with four questions.

The first is, “What are your objectives of entering into this coaching relationship?” This means, “What do you want? What’s important to you?”

The second question is, “What gets in the way? What are the the habits, beliefs, and situations in your life that you’re aware interfere with what you’re most longing for?”

The third question is, “What can we count on you for? What are your strengths? What are the habits that you’ve already developed in your life, where you and everyone else can hold you accountable?” For some, it may be that they’ve cultivated the habit of transparency, of telling the truth. For someone else, it might be the daily practice of meditation or Chi Kung.

And the last question has to do with outcomes. “At the end of this eight week coaching series, how would you like to be different? What would you like to be different? How would you like things to look, in an objective, measurable way? (more…)

This is a practice from my book Leap Before You Look.

Lie down on your back
Under a cloudless sky.
Open yourself to the nature of infinity.
Let yourself move out infinitely in any direction
And be soberly present with the unavoidable fact
That as far as you travel,
You are still only halfway there.
There are no limits.
You cannot think about infinity.
It will blow your mind.
You can only become one with the infinite.
Look into the sky without blinking.
Let the sky enter you, so there is no inner and outer remaining.
Then close your eyes and stare into the inner limitless sky.

This simple practice, to look into the open, cloudless sky, has been used in every tradition in every age. I was introduced to it in the Tibetan refugee community of Bodh Nath in Katmandhu by the great Dzogchen teacher Choki Nyima Rimpoche. Once it is pointed out to you, it becomes so obvious—it was there all along. Many of us get involved in spiritual practices and teachings, searching for who we really are, and the answer is right there above our heads all along: you only have to look up into the vastness of the sky. This practice is great for modern humanity, as we have grown so used to a man-made world. Everything has been modified; everything has our fingerprints all over it, except the sky. The vastness of the sky cannot be touched, cannot be modified; it remains the last outpost of absolute innocence. (more…)

I just watched a fascinating new film this weekend, which has got considerably less attention than it deserves. It’s called “The Living Matrix,” and features Bruce Lipton, Lynne McTaggart, Eric Pearl, and Marilyn Schlitz, president of the Institute of Noetic Sciences.The film explores the fascinating question of spontaneous remission from disease: healings that occur everyday, and yet are unexplained by conventional medical science.

The movie tells us that every day, in hospitals all over the world, people will suddenly get better for no logical reason whatsoever. A cancer tumor the size of a grapefruit can disappear overnight. By now, this is well-documented. Because there is absolutely no explanation within the current medical model, these cases simply get ignored.

The premise of “The Living Matrix” is that we don’t understand the mechanics of “miraculous healing” and spontaneous remission simply because we are applying the wrong model. We’ve tended to view the body as though it’s a machine. We feed it the right nutrients, give it the right exercise, keep it well hydrated, and, when it gets sick, we go to an expert who tells us to take the right kind of drugs. It’s essentially a mechanical view of the human body. This view, which is by far the most prevalent in contemporary medicine and science, sees consciousness as a by-product of the body. (more…)