December 2009


Happy Holidays to all our friends.

Chameli told me last night that it was the longest night of the entire year, which means that we have officially shifted from a phase of turning in, dying and withdraw, to a new phase of rebirth, regeneration, and fresh beginnings.  By now the last of the brown leaves have fallen from the trees and become mush under our feet on the wet ground.  And deep beneath the surface of the earth, the first stirrings are preparing themselves for next year’s spring.

These cycles of death and renewal have always been part of our lives, but I get the sense that this year it is more poignant than ever.  For most of us 2009 has been quite a year.  Most of the people I have met with this year have been facing, in a personal way, what we are all facing in a collective way: the old habits by which we live our lives are no longer sustainable.  We are being presented with a wake-up-call to try something completely new.

(more…)

Advertisements

Here is a passage from my 2005 Bestseller, “The Translucent Revolution.”

As with every other area of our lives, there is a symbiotic relationship between the depth of our translucence and the way we view otherness. Translucence naturally shifts our habits of relating, without our doing anything about it. We have less to defend as we come to know ourselves as bigger than our own story, and our relating naturally becomes less strategic. As we see the other as myself, even if only in snapshots, we find that compassion occurs effortlessly. We develop more humor about the idiosyncrasies of our personality. We have less investment in laboriously working things out, and a greater willingness to breathe a sigh and return to innocence. The need to change others relaxes, since we are less tied to them as a source of our well-being. All these things can happen more or less spontaneously as by-products of waking up. At the same time, the attention we bring to our habits of relating can deepen and stabilize our expression of translucence. We can always bring more skillful means, more as an art form than as self-improvement, to our relating. We can become more aware of, and tell the truth about, the old habits that have created separation. These old habits run deep, and they will not necessarily die on their own. Our social environment reinforces them. When we are willing to put awakening into the fire of relationship, it will reveal all old habits and allow them to be released. Says Gay Hendricks:

“I think therein lies the difficulty, as well as the awesome beauty, of relationships. The universe is attempting to meet itself in play. When one person meets another, as that space links up with that space again, it pushes to the surface all the little places where we’ve withdrawn from space. Whether it’s being physically beaten, or starved to death, or criticized, or in beating others, those are the places where we’ve withdrawn and crystallized into mass, and then that has to come to the surface.”
(more…)

Here is a passage from my 2005 Bestseller, “The Translucent Revolution.”

Carolyn Anderson and John Zwerver, the founders of a UN-affiliated organization called Global Family, call this model of people working together “co-creation.” Anderson is the co-author of The Co-Creators Handbook. She defines co-creation as “co-participating consciously with the laws or patterns of life itself, conscious alignment with the essence of others and with nature.”

Anderson and Zwerver offer several other examples of co-creative businesses, where the CEO or president has come to a position of stewardship, drawing out and giving voice to the innate wisdom of the collective. For as long as we can remember, Iago-based business has used a dominator model.  Decisions are made by the CEO and senior management, who are retained by investors to represent their interests: to make as much money as possible. The dominator model of doing business may make money, but the hidden cost is high. First, everyone in the company, from middle management down to the shop floor, is placed in a position of subordination. Divorced from their own vision, their integrity and inspiration become entirely irrelevant in this ask-no-questions environment. If you want to keep your job, you don’t question company policy. People feel used. Absenteeism and job turnover rise, since those doing the hands-on work feel little or no loyalty to the company, to its reputation, or to what it produces.

(more…)

Here is a practice you can use right away, from my book “Leap Before You Look.”

Every one or two months,
Take a day where you do absolutely nothing,
Just as you would do if you had the flu,
But do it when you’re not sick.
Switch off the phones, shut down the computer.
If necessary, stay in bed all day.
Do as little as possible.
Just lie still and give the body and the psyche a chance for deep healing.
If you’re married, if you live with your family or friends,
You could even alternate stillness days:
One of you could completely take care of the other, including meals in bed, then switch.
If possible, refrain from watching television or other distractions.
Just lie still and give all of yourself,
Including your senses,
Twenty-four hours of undiluted rest.

(more…)

Dear Friends,

I’m in the middle of a whirlwind European tour here, and so this post will be shorter than others have been.

We had a wonderful evening event in Oslo last week, hosted by Peter Svenning, one of our certified Awakening Coaches.  Great people, mostly from professional backgrounds, quickly “got” what this approach is about.  Many will now be coming to the Awakening Coaching Training in Stockholm, February 20-24th.  Next day I saw some very inspiring people in Oslo for private sessions.  I’m constantly amazed by how regular people with relatively little background in “spirituality” can easily drop out of the mind and into the mystery of presence.

I took the train from Oslo to Stockholm, which took most of the day, and was a great treat.  When was the last time you took a really long train ride?  It’s great.  The carriage sways back and forth like the rocking of a cradle, massaging you into letting go.  You pass through small villages, larger towns, and then endless forest and fields put to rest for the winter.  I could spend my life on European trains!  The buffet car serves great food, the internet connection allows you to get things done, and the rest of your life seems far away.

(more…)